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Cork Science and Innovation Park (CSIP) - UCC Precinct

Facts

Master plan for the development of UCC lands (precinct 2) within the proposed Cork Science & Innovation Park.

Site area

Precinct 2 comprises 16.3 ha (40.3 acres) within the proposed overall park of approximately 90 ha (222 acres).



Features

The master plan for the UCC precinct at CSIP was prepared to maximise the potential benefit to UCC for these lands while at the same time having regard to the other precincts to ensure a collaborative effort towards the success of the overall park.  In this context the master plan supports and defers to the initial masterplan objectives, as contained within the CSIP Framework Masterplan, for the establishment of a 3rd Generation Science Park.

The mix of uses envisaged for Precinct 2 aims at fostering a productive knowledge exchange and sustaining a broad group of professionals in the areas of research and innovation.

The majority of building areas are dedicated to offices, typically multi-purpose properties designed for companies growing out of the incubation phase and looking for more spacious environments. Owner-occupiers and larger business are also catered for in this category.

The second largest group of buildings provides spaces for research and innovation, directly linked to UCC or private research institutions.

The plan also accommodates light manufacturing facilities or spaces for “innovation-led”, small scale production enterprises.

Provision is also made for spaces for casual meetings such as cafe’ and restaurants, spaces for leisure or fitness and small units for light shopping and other daily needs such as child-care or GP surgery.

The idea of subdividing the site into a series of relatively small areas or “fields” is derived from the former use and current popular name of the site: “the farm”. These plots constitute a grid upon which building footprints and open areas can be laid out with relative freedom without compromising the integrity and coherence of the overall plan.




Curragheen, Bishopstown, Co. Cork